Is it all real, or is it all an ‘illusion’? Make up your mind…

Image credit: Emerging Gently.

Image credit: Emerging Gently.

I’m fortunate enough to live in what I think is one of the most beautiful places in Canada, if not the world. I chose to live here. I wasn’t born here, my parents didn’t bring me here (although the fact that they left me a house here in their will did have a strong influence on my decision to move here), and a job did not bring me here. I live in a semi-arid valley that is hot in the summer, and experiences moderate (by Canadian standards) winters. It offers many outdoor recreational opportunities during all seasons. Ride along any of the meandering back roads around here, and you’re treated to spectacular scenery of mountains, lakes, cliffs, hoodoos, desert sage, and blue sky. Continue reading

New Thought, Divine Science, and Christian Science

Sure, Christian Science is an obscure religion with few followers now, and even at its height, it never even approached much over one million followers worldwide, if even that many, according to information I’ve been able to find. However, if you look at some other spiritual and religious movements, you might see echoes of Christian Science in them, with New Thought and the Church of Divine Science being the best known. You might even think that these are different incarnations of Christian Science, or that Christian Science has had more influence than it’s been given credit for. You’d be half right in that assumption. In this post, I’ll give a brief overview of these philosophies and how they relate to Christian Science. Continue reading

What’s the word for…?

Self-cannibalism is the practice of eating oneself, also called autocannibalism, or autosarcophagy.
(Wikipedia)

I recently heard about a Christian Science branch church that received a large bequest from a recently deceased member. Back in the day, when I was on the Board of Directors at my own branch church, we also received a bequest from a deceased member. The tiny Christian Science Society in the community where I live now is mainly sustained by a large amount of money they have in savings that’s been built up over the years by, you guessed it, bequests. Do you see a pattern? Continue reading

Princestia

I feel like having a riff on the insular culture of Christian Science. My inspiration comes from a discussion thread in a group I’m in about goings-on in the wider Principia community. Principia, for those not in the know, is a school and college for Christian Scientists, located in St. Louis, Missouri (school), and Elsah, Illinois (college). One person in the thread referred to Principia as ‘Princest-Land’. I laughed at that term, as it is such an apt description of the somewhat insular-to-the-point-of-incestuous Principia community, so I riffed off that and came up with my new name for Principia: Princestia. Continue reading

Can you die of a broken heart?

The recent deaths at the end of 2016 (a year that seems to have taken its share of well-known people from this world) of actresses Carrie Fisher, and a day later her mother Debbie Reynolds, made me recall the deaths of my own parents, who died nine months apart in 2009 (my mother in March, my father in December). It begs a question for me: can someone die of a broken heart? I’ve seen some anecdotal evidence that the death of a spouse/partner or other close person can have an effect on the health of the survivor. Continue reading

Christ Jesus

This is #13 in a series of posts looking at the 26 Christian Science Weekly Bible Lesson subjects, chosen by Mary Baker Eddy, and rotated twice per year. These lessons are the sermon at each Christian Science church worldwide, and are read by Christian Scientists daily. Today’s subject is ‘Christ Jesus’. Look for other posts in the category ‘Lesson Sermon Subjects‘. 


Continue reading

The names may change, but the story is still the same…

LinkedIn, for those who may not be familiar, is a social media platform for professional networking. I’ve been on LinkedIn for around 10 or so years. My first connections on LinkedIn come from the time when I was working at The Mother Church. Consequently, many connections I have are related in some way to Christian Science. While I’ve worked to weed out some of the more deeply-marinated-in-Christian Science folks from my profile, and to actively seek connections that are more professionally relevant to me now, I still get a lot of suggested connections who are Christian Science practitioners or other such Christian Science-related professions. This now provides a weird sort of entertainment for me. Continue reading

Forgiveness

forgiveness

Image source: Facebook page ‘Power of Positivity’.

Forgiveness is a topic that comes up a lot these days, and it is an especially hot topic sometimes within the on-line ex-Christian Scientist communities I’m a part of. It’s a topic I’ve thought about a lot too, and my thought about what forgiveness is have evolved a lot, especially from where I was as a Christian Scientist. Continue reading

Life

This is #12 in a series of posts looking at the 26 Christian Science Weekly Bible Lesson subjects, chosen by Mary Baker Eddy, and rotated twice per year. These lessons are the sermon at each Christian Science church worldwide, and are read by Christian Scientists daily. Today’s subject is ‘Life’. Look for other posts in the category “Lesson Sermon Subjects“.


Life in the context of today’s subject, is one of Mary Baker Eddy’s seven ‘synonyms’ for God (the word is capitalized when used in this context–see ‘Christian Science Grammar’ in my glossary of terms for more on this), and one of the six of these that is a Lesson Sermon topic (Principle seems not to get a nod for some reason). So, what is this thing called ‘Life’? Continue reading

Recycling…

This was posted in an on-line group I’m in, and I thought it was funny. All over the world, old Christian Science churches are being re-purposed as this moribund religion shrinks away to its ‘native nothingness’ (to use a well-known phrase from Mary Baker Eddy). Some have become condominiums, many have found new life as theatres, and others have become homes to congregants of different religions. Continue reading