Downplaying…

The topic of this post is something on my sort of imaginary (because I’ve never written it down) list of silly things I think about because I’m a former Christian Scientist, and it is something I’ve written on before. I recently had an appointment with a new dentist I recently switched to. As with any such appointment with a new care provider, there are the usual questions about allergies, medications, and any family medical history to be aware of. Proudly, I listed the three medications I do take (all related to asthma and allergies). Now, most people wouldn’t think anything of this sort of thing, but for me, it’s still a bit of a big deal to be a ‘normal’ person who sometimes does take prescription medications, or who is at least open to the idea. Continue reading

Moral Ambiguities of Christian Scientists

what is truth

Image credit: evidence unseen (www.evidenceunseen.com).

My thoughts for this post have been rattling around in my brain for quite a while, and a discussion thread on Facebook with a couple of ex-Christian Scientist friends re-ignited my interest in this idea not too long ago.

I think Christian Science can, and sometimes does, make at least some people fundamentally dishonest. Now, before you run screaming, “my mom is the nicest, most honest person around, she’d never tell a lie!” hear me out. I’m talking about deeper honesty here, deeper than whether or not someone is telling you a lie or not. I’m talking about actions, and what one perceives to be right and true or not. Christian Science theology can have a way of blurring the lines between right and wrong for some people. Continue reading

Don’t wait…

I’m sure I’ve mentioned in other posts how former Christian Scientists, such as myself, will often wait longer than we should to seek treatment for injuries and ailments. The reasons for us largely boil down to having had it drilled into us since childhood that disease and accidents are unreal according to God, so therefore, there really is nothing wrong. So, we go into a state of denial, and ignore or downplay the problem…until it doesn’t go away, but rather, usually gets worse. Then, we do something about it. Continue reading

Unpacking

Image credit: Emerging Gently.

Image credit: Emerging Gently.

Throughout our lives, we unpack stuff. You go on a trip, you unpack some stuff at the destination so you can easily access things. You return home, you unpack your stuff, and settle back into your routine at home. You move, you pack all your stuff up, haul it to your new home, then unpack. It’s part of the cycle of life. It’s also part of what I’d call the practice of good mental health. A term I’ve learned over the past few years in relation to mental health is precisely this term: unpacking. Continue reading

Surveying

My long-term readers will recall that I did a survey of former Christian Scientists and their various experiences post-Christian Science, in Christian Science, why they left, and a few other things. Click here to view the related posts on my previous survey.

Well, the survey has been resurrected, and changed. This time, results will be posted on The Ex-Christian Scientist website, of which I am an editor.

Please click this link to fill out the survey! Thanks for participating!

Why I’m doing this…

My regular readers may (or may not) know that I am involved as an editor and writer for the website ‘The Ex-Christian Scientist‘. It is increasingly becoming the main focus for my ‘work’ in the ex-Christian Scientist community, and why my posting here on this blog has become more infrequent. If you have not already done so, I encourage you to visit the site. It is certainly a resource I wish I had six years ago when I had the first inklings of my final departure from Christian Science.

This is a re-posting of my own recently published personal mission statement for the site.


Image credit: The Ex-Christian Scientist (exchristianscience.com).

Image credit: The Ex-Christian Scientist (exchristianscience.com).

My final departure from Christian Science began six years ago, when my Mom unexpectedly became ill and died, all within the span of about three months. She died in excruciating pain with a large tumour in her abdomen, all the while refusing any sort of medical intervention–not even pain abatement. She died in a Christian Science nursing facility before I was able to fly cross-country to see her. Later the same year, my Dad succumbed to untreated heart failure which had been going on for an estimated 5 – 7 years. Continue reading

You age, but growing ‘old’ is optional…

As I wrote in a previous post, I recently built myself a small deck out behind my home. It was a physically demanding job, and the next day I felt quite sore. I’ve come to realize as I get older, that this whole ‘getting sore’ thing is intensifying somewhat. I also realize that in some ways, perhaps it’s a function of my attitude. Now, before you start thinking that I’m going to say that my thought alone is causing something physical, I’ll stop you there. My attitude over the past few years is something that has kept me from doing the physically active things I’ve done in the past that have allowed me to feel better, and not suffer such consequences of intermittent activity. Continue reading

Medical Neglect in the Name of God – Part 1

Rita Swan, the founder of C.H.I.L.D. Inc. is featured on this podcast from the Thinking Atheist. Here, she eloquently makes the case against the legal permissiveness of religious faith-healing in the case of children, which has caused the needless deaths of too many children. Swan is a former Christian Scientist.

http://percolate.blogtalkradio.com/offsiteplayer?hostId=138407&episodeId=8235103

I did it and nothing else gets credit…

I built a small deck out behind the townhouse I rent over a recent long weekend. I’m not much of a carpenter, but I have what I’d call decent ‘common-sense’ skills, and plenty of knowledge gained from watching and helping others who are very good carpenters. One of them was my Dad, whom I spent many years of my youth watching (at first), then later helping him with projects. That mentorship has continued in more recent years with opportunities to help friends with various projects.

Continue reading

What do you do?

if-prayer-worked-why-not-this

Image credit: One Furious Llama (onefuriousllama.com).

As I’m sure many have done, I’ve watched with horror and sadness at the unfolding humanitarian crisis in Syria that has resulted in a flood of refugees fleeing to Europe. This has been the largest migration of refugees to Europe since World War II. Some European countries have welcomed the refugees with open arms, others have greeted them with racial slurs and personal insults–including one Hungarian journalist who chose to stick her foot out in front of a refugee who was running and trip them. Pressure is also mounting here in my own country, Canada, to step up and accept more refugees, and it became a hot-button issue in our recent federal election campaign. Continue reading