Is it all real, or is it all an ‘illusion’? Make up your mind…

Image credit: Emerging Gently.

Image credit: Emerging Gently.

I’m fortunate enough to live in what I think is one of the most beautiful places in Canada, if not the world. I chose to live here. I wasn’t born here, my parents didn’t bring me here (although the fact that they left me a house here in their will did have a strong influence on my decision to move here), and a job did not bring me here. I live in a semi-arid valley that is hot in the summer, and experiences moderate (by Canadian standards) winters. It offers many outdoor recreational opportunities during all seasons. Ride along any of the meandering back roads around here, and you’re treated to spectacular scenery of mountains, lakes, cliffs, hoodoos, desert sage, and blue sky. Continue reading

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The Matthew Code & My Experience With Hypocrisy at Principia

“(15) If your brother sins against you, go and show him his fault, just between the two of you. If he listens to you, you have won your brother over. (16) But if he will not listen, take one or two others along, so that ‘every matter may be established by the testimony of two or three witnesses.’ (17) If he refuses to listen to them, tell it to the church; and if he refuses to listen even to the church, treat him as you would a pagan or tax collector.”
(Matthew 18:15-17 – New International Version)

The Matthew Code, as the above quoted Bible verses have come to be known, was thrown at me and my fellow students at Principia College time and time again, and is a part of the moral code that Principia students are required to abide by. Continue reading

The Church of the Holy Napkin

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Photo credit: Kindism (kindism.org)

I’m not religious, as regular readers of this blog will attest. Even when I was a Christian Scientist (or trying to be one), I wasn’t overly religious. I’ve rarely had much time or tolerance for those who are radically religious. Mostly, it’s because I find their arguments, logic, and claims to the supremacy of their belief over all others to be completely fallacious, and often highly offensive. Religious people are driven by belief and rhetoric, rarely by evidence or logic–at least that’s how I see it. Others may see it differently, and everyone is entitled to their opinion; we’ll just agree to disagree then. Continue reading